NOS OG 90s Real Skateboards With Trucks Tommy Guerrero Native Americans Indians

NOS_OG_90s_Real_Skateboards_With_Trucks_Tommy_Guerrero_Native_Americans_Indians_01_oe
NOS OG 90s Real Skateboards With Trucks Tommy Guerrero Native Americans Indians
NOS OG 90s Real Skateboards With Trucks Tommy Guerrero Native Americans Indians
NOS OG 90s Real Skateboards With Trucks Tommy Guerrero Native Americans Indians
NOS OG 90s Real Skateboards With Trucks Tommy Guerrero Native Americans Indians
NOS OG 90s Real Skateboards With Trucks Tommy Guerrero Native Americans Indians
NOS OG 90s Real Skateboards With Trucks Tommy Guerrero Native Americans Indians
NOS OG 90s Real Skateboards With Trucks Tommy Guerrero Native Americans Indians
NOS OG 90s Real Skateboards With Trucks Tommy Guerrero Native Americans Indians
NOS OG 90s Real Skateboards With Trucks Tommy Guerrero Native Americans Indians
NOS OG 90s Real Skateboards With Trucks Tommy Guerrero Native Americans Indians
NOS OG 90s Real Skateboards With Trucks Tommy Guerrero Native Americans Indians
NOS OG 90s Real Skateboards With Trucks Tommy Guerrero Native Americans Indians

NOS OG 90s Real Skateboards With Trucks Tommy Guerrero Native Americans Indians
VINTAGE (1990s) ORIGINAL SKATEBOARD FEATURING EIGHT NATIVE AMERICANS (American Indians), ON HORSEBACK WITH ORIGINAL TRUCKS AND WHEELS INCLUDED. THEY ARE NOT ATTACHED TO THE BOARD AND I DONT HAVE THE HARDWARE TO REATTACH THEM. THUNDER TRUCKS WITH SPITFIRE WHEELS MADE IN USA (original). THIS IS UNRESTORED AND IN THE CONDITION FOUND. PLEASE LOOK AT ALL OF THE PHOTOGRAPHS AND ASK QUESTIONS. THE PICTURES WILL SHOW IMPERFECTIONS IN THE PAINT, FINISH AND THE WOOD. SOMEBODY NAMED MELISSA LOVED THIS SKATEBOARD SO MUCH THAT SHE SCRATCHED HER NAME INTO THE CLEAR FINISH ON TH BOTTOM. I THINK HER NAME CAN BE REMOVED BY SOMEONE WHO REALLY KNOWS ABOUT REFINISHING. IT DOESNT LOOK LIKE MELISSA SCRATCHED OR REMOVED VERY MUCH PAINT IF ANY UNDERNEATH THE CLEAR FINISH. I HAVE PURPOSELY LEFT THE GRAFFITI ON THIS SKATEBOARD BECAUSE I BELIEVE IT WAS MEANT TO BE LEFT ALONE. THE TOP OF THE BOARD READS. COLUMBUS DIDNT DISCOVER AMERICA HE INVADED IT REMEMBER THE REAL AMERICANS, THE NATIVE AMERICANS REAL SKATEBOARDS. Smoke and pet-free home. The item “NOS OG 90s Real Skateboards With Trucks Tommy Guerrero Native Americans Indians” is in sale since Sunday, December 22, 2019. This item is in the category “Sporting Goods\Outdoor Sports\Skateboarding & Longboarding\Vintage”. The seller is “estatejewelry4u” and is located in Tracy, California. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, South africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, Ukraine, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa rica, Panama, Trinidad and tobago, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Brunei darussalam, Bolivia, Ecuador, Egypt, French guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Cayman islands, Liechtenstein, Sri lanka, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macao, Martinique, Maldives, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Viet nam, Uruguay.
  • Brand: Real Skateboards
  • Model: OG 90s Real
  • Theme: NATIVE AMERICANS (INDIANS) ON HORSEBACK
  • Featured Refinements: Nos Skateboard

NOS OG 90s Real Skateboards With Trucks Tommy Guerrero Native Americans Indians

1891 AMERICAN INDIANS George Catlin INDIAN War SIOUX Weapon West Antique BUFFALO

1891_AMERICAN_INDIANS_George_Catlin_INDIAN_War_SIOUX_Weapon_West_Antique_BUFFALO_01_ui
1891 AMERICAN INDIANS George Catlin INDIAN War SIOUX Weapon West Antique BUFFALO
1891 AMERICAN INDIANS George Catlin INDIAN War SIOUX Weapon West Antique BUFFALO
1891 AMERICAN INDIANS George Catlin INDIAN War SIOUX Weapon West Antique BUFFALO
1891 AMERICAN INDIANS George Catlin INDIAN War SIOUX Weapon West Antique BUFFALO
1891 AMERICAN INDIANS George Catlin INDIAN War SIOUX Weapon West Antique BUFFALO
1891 AMERICAN INDIANS George Catlin INDIAN War SIOUX Weapon West Antique BUFFALO
1891 AMERICAN INDIANS George Catlin INDIAN War SIOUX Weapon West Antique BUFFALO
1891 AMERICAN INDIANS George Catlin INDIAN War SIOUX Weapon West Antique BUFFALO
1891 AMERICAN INDIANS George Catlin INDIAN War SIOUX Weapon West Antique BUFFALO
1891 AMERICAN INDIANS George Catlin INDIAN War SIOUX Weapon West Antique BUFFALO
1891 AMERICAN INDIANS George Catlin INDIAN War SIOUX Weapon West Antique BUFFALO
1891 AMERICAN INDIANS George Catlin INDIAN War SIOUX Weapon West Antique BUFFALO

1891 AMERICAN INDIANS George Catlin INDIAN War SIOUX Weapon West Antique BUFFALO
Note: Many of my clients are scholars and researchers seeking specific information related to their field of interest. For their convenience I include the following details directly from this book. Historical Subject Matter Discussed/Illustrated in this Book (Partial Only, See Full Contents Below): George Catlin Life Among the Indians Decorative Fine Binding Illustrated Victorian Native American Indian Indians America Tribes Plains War History Character Civilization Wyoming Massacre Indian Tribes Portraits Costumes Dress Sioux Indian Village Wigwams Drying Meat Indian Slavery Scalping Scalp-Day Scalps Warriors War Dress War Paint Weapons Shield Warfare War Whoop Flags Prisoners of War Calumet Pipe of Peace Medicine Men Wedding Rain Making Medicine Lodge Great White Medicine Medicine Bag Painting Wild Horses Buffalo Prairie Buffalo Hunt Chase Grizzly Bear Eagle Mandan Indians War Chief Riccarree Chief Indian Signal Fort Pierre Sioux Doctor Dog Canoe Pawnee War Party Falls of St. Anthony Fox and Wisconsin River St. Peters River Pipe Stone Quarry Stone Man Medicine Root Diggers Comanche Indians Deer Stalking Pawnee Picts Fort Gibson Cherokees Creeks Seminole Treaty Dades Massacre Capture of Osceola Neetmok Great Osage Orinoco Indians Amazon Cannibals South American Indians Red Indians in London Queen of England Red Indians in Paris. LIFE AMONG THE INDIANS. Undated, has handwritten inscription dated 1891. Published by Gall and Inglis, London. 8 x 5 decorated cloth hardcover with gilt decoration. Condition: GOOD ANTIQUE CONDITION. Beautiful London edition binding as shown in photo. Front inner hinge cracked, rear hinge starting, text block still seated securely. Text is clean and complete. Foxing and toning, most prominent at front and back pages. No torn, loose or missing pages. Handwritten inscription at front dated 1891 at Sydney, Australia. Great example of this rare 19th-century George Catlin American Indian title. LIFE AMONG THE INDIANS is a memoir of George Catlins experiences among the Indians of America. Originally written for a youthful audience, the authors mature narrative style, attention to detail and compelling subject matter makes this a timeless work that will appeal to readers of all ages. George Catlin (July 26, 1796 December 23, 1872) was an American painter, author, and traveler who specialized in portraits of Native Americans in the Old West. Catlin was the first white man to depict Plains Indians in their native territory. He made five trips into the West during the 1830s. There, at the edge of the frontier, the young artist produced the most vivid and penetrating portraits of his career. During later trips along the Arkansas, Red and Mississippi rivers, as well as visits to Florida and the Great Lakes, he produced more than 500 paintings and gathered a substantial collection of artifacts. Over the course of his career, Catlin visited more than fifty American Indian tribes, and also tribes in Central and South America. He witnessed sights that we can only imagine, or perhaps, if were lucky, see re-created in movies: Indians hunting buffalo, prairies on fire, Indians capturing wild horses on the Plains, sacred Indian rituals, ceremonies and dances. In the pages of LIFE AMONG THE INDIANS are Catlins fascinating descriptions of Indian villages, daily life, dress, ceremonial costumes, weapons, the social structure of the tribes, and much more all observed decades before the Indian wars of the later 19th century. In some instances, Catlin was one of the first white men the Indians he visited ever saw. You cant help but feel a sense of wonder as you read of the glorious scenes Catlin witnessed with his own eyes. Catlin writes in the Preface. Not content with this collection I had thus made and shown to the world, I started again in 1853 for Venezuela, in South America, and subsequently traversed British and Dutch Guiana, the Valley of the Amazon, and other parts of Brazil, the Andes, Peru, Ecuador, Bolivia, California, to the Aleutian Islands, the Pacific Coast to the mouth of the Columbia, across the Rocky Mountains to Santa Fe, by the Rio de Norte to Matamoros in Mexico, to Guatemala, to Yucatan, to Cuba, and back to the starting point. LIFE AMONG THE INDIANS is an incredible historical document. Catlin is remembered primarily for his paintings, but what he rendered in word and text is equally important. To give you a full appreciation for the breadth and scope of this amazing work, I have created a summary of the Contents below, followed by a selection of historical illustrations from this rare antique book. I hope youll take a moment to have a look. CHAPTER ONE THE INDIANS OF AMERICA: The Name Indian General Character Indian Civilisation National Character. CHAPTER TWO MY ADVENTURE WITH THE FIRST INDIAN I EVER SAW: Wyoming Massacre Valley of the Oc-qua-go The Old Saw Mill Lick A Chill, a Shiver, and False Alarm John Darrow Story of the Panther Deer in the Lick A Huge Indian Red Indian at the Lick A Run from the Lick Johnny ONeils Gipsies Georges Indians The Saddle of Venison On-o-gong-ways Story The Kettle of Gold My Tomahawk. CHAPTER THREE HOW THE INDIANS BUILD THEIR WIGWAMS: Indian Tribes Portraits and Costumes The Sioux Sioux Village Interior of Wigwams Drying Meat Indian Slavery Scalp-Day Skin-builders Grass Builders Dirt Builders Bark Builders Timber Builders. CHAPTER FOUR INDIAN WARFARE SCALPS AND SCALPING: Warriors War Dress and War Paint War Weapons Smoking the Shield Warfare War Whoop War Whistles Flags Scalps and Scalping Prisoners of War Calumet (Pipe of Peace). CHAPTER FIVE MEDICINE MEN DRAWING FIRE FROM THE SUN: Medicine Men Looking At the Sun Medicine Wedding Rain Makers Rain Stoppers Medicine Lodge The Great White Medicine Medicine Bag. CHAPTER SIX HOW THE INDIANS PAINT THEMSELVES THE PRAIRIES: Indians Colour and Form Indians Painting Wild Horses and Buffaloes The Prairies. CHAPTER SEVEN CATCHING WILD HORSES A BUFFALO HUNT: Catching Wild Horses Turning to the Left Walking the Circle Buffalo Chase The Giant Bull. CHAPTER EIGHT AN ADVENTURE WITH BEARS: Stores Laid In The Tame Eagle Bivouacing Melting the Coffee Pot Freaks of the Eagle Stoop of the Eagle Grizzly Bear inspecting Us Grizzly Bears overhauling us Adieu to the Grizzlies. CHAPTER NINE THE MANDAN INDIANS: Mandan Singularities Mandan War Chief Lance of the Riccarree Chief Mah-to-toh-pa and the Crow Chief Indian Belles Singular names Tradition of the Flood Destruction of the Mandans Taking Leave of the Mandans A Silent Gift. CHAPTER TEN THE SIOUX INDIANS A CHALLENGE! Indian Signal An excitement Fort Pierre The Sioux Doctor Sioux Portraits Jealous Sioux Chiefs Story of the Dog Death of Mah-to-chee-ga Pursuit of the Dog Death of the Dog The Author Challenged. CHAPTER ELEVEN PIPE STONE QUARRY THE THUNDERS NEST STONE MAN MEDICINE: Canoe Stolen Pawnee War Party Falls of St. Anthony Fox and Wisconsin Rivers St. Peters River Pipe Stone Quarry Stone Man Medicine The Thunders Nest Descent of St. Peters Packs Stolen The Root Diggers. CHAPTER TWELVE A RIDE TO THE CAMANCHEES A FALSE ALARM: Ride to the Comanches Charley Bought Deer Stalking The Author Decoyed Story of the Panther Walking the Circle Creasing a Wild Horse Indians About! Stampado A False Alarm Indian Honesty. CHAPTER THIRTEEN A SOLITARY RIDE ON CHARLEY ACROSS THE PRAIRIES: Grand Review Pawnee Picts Fort Gibson Charley saddled for St. Louis Cherokees and Creeks Seminole Treaty Death of Seminole Chief Dades Massacre Capture of Osceola A Sad Story Neetmok Death of Osceola Charleys Freaks A Shake and a Roll in the Grass Bivouac with Charley Thunder Storm on the Prairies Shooting the Buck Charley tracking the Buck Crossing the Great Osage. CHAPTER FOURTEEN A JOURNEY DOWN THE ORINOCO THE HANDSOME DANCE: Caracas The Scylla Plains of Venezuela Indians of Venezuela The Handsome Dance The Bolas Catching the Wild Horse Canoeing on the Orinoco Opening of a Spathe Pirates at the Spathe Campanero (The Bell Bird) The Wakened Sloth Mouths of the Orinoco Wigwams in the Trees. CHAPTER FIFTEEN EN ROUTE FOR THE AMAZON THE MEDICINE GUN: Demerara Paramaribo Rio Essequibo Howling Monkeys Village Treachery of Interpreter Indian Hospitality Indian superstition Showing Revolver to the Indians The Old Minie The Young Revolver Hill of the Shining Stones Picking up a Rattlesnake A Bed of Poppies. CHAPTER SIXTEEN RIO TROMBUTAS ADVENTURES WITH A TIGER AND A RATTLESNAKE: Valley of Amazon Head of the Trombutas A Strong Lie Tiger Shooting Bridling an Alligator Assemblage of Monkeys Monkeys Theft Shooting a Rattlesnake Beheaded Rattlesnake Turtle Hunt Turtles Eggs Turtle Butter Obidos Santarem Para. CHAPTER SEVENTEEN STILL EN ROUTE FOR THE AMAZON AN ADVENTURE WITH PECCARIES: Caribbee Indians Acary Mountains Amazon slope of the Acary The Equator The Amazons The American Cannibals Dirt Eaters and Stone Eaters Scenery of the Trombutas Forest above a Forest Music of the Trombutas Treed by Peccaries Fight with the Peccaries. CHAPTER EIGHTEEN ON THE AMAZON: South American Indians Nest builders of the Amazon The Steamer Marajo Shores of the Amazon Upper Forest Natures Temple Opera Glass on the Amazon Passing Obidos A Scene at Obidos Indians on the Amazon Indian Missions Lingua Geral Tribes of Upper Amazon. CHAPTER NINETEEN THE INDIANS OF THE AMAZON POISONED ARROWS: Connibos Shed Builders Chetibos Pottery of the Connibos Blow Gun Poisoned Arrows Experiments with Poisoned Arrows Fatality of Poisoned Arrows Trouble with a Medicine Man A Monkey Skinner Unpainting Indan Portraits. CHAPTER TWENTY RED INDIANS IN LONDON: Indians in London Indians before the Queen Ioway Indians An Indian Doctors Speech in London Ealing Park War Chiefs Speech to the Duke of Cambridge Savage Devotion Episcopal Clergymen talk with the Indians War Chiefs reply to Clergymen The Indians Belief Charity of Indians The Doctors Speech on Charity Indians Charity on a steamer. CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE RED INDIANS IN PARIS: War Chiefs Speech to the King and Queen Louis Phillippe in an Indian Village. Remember folks, this is an 1891 original. This book is 130 years old. Please be sure to add me to your List of Favorite Sellers. Don’t miss out on any of my latest listings. NEETMOK BOOKS IS A REGISTERED MEMBER OF EBAYS VERO PROGRAM. When you prepare your listings you generally should use only material text, photographs, etc. And trademarks/names that you created or own yourself or licensed from the owners. Item description text; lists of contents, lists of illustrations/photos; scanned images, etc. UNAUTHORIZED USE OF ITEM DESCRIPTION TEXT INCLUDING SUMMARIES OF CONTENTS, ILLUSTRATIONS, ETC. PHOTOS OR OTHER PROPRIETARY INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED AND WILL BE REPORTED TO EBAYS VERO DEPARTMENT FOR IMMEDIATE ACTION. Track Page Views With. Auctiva’s FREE Counter. The item “1891 AMERICAN INDIANS George Catlin INDIAN War SIOUX Weapon West Antique BUFFALO” is in sale since Saturday, June 26, 2021. This item is in the category “Books & Magazines\Antiquarian & Collectible”. The seller is “neetmok” and is located in South Salem, New York. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, South africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, Ukraine, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa rica, Panama, Trinidad and tobago, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Antigua and barbuda, Aruba, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Saint kitts and nevis, Saint lucia, Montserrat, Turks and caicos islands, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Brunei darussalam, Bolivia, Ecuador, Egypt, French guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Cayman islands, Liechtenstein, Sri lanka, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macao, Martinique, Maldives, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Viet nam, Uruguay.
  • Year Printed: 1891
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom
  • Topic: Indian Wars
  • Binding: Fine Binding
  • Region: North America
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Illustrator: George Catlin
  • Author: George Catlin
  • Subject: Military & War
  • Original/Facsimile: Original
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Gall & Inglis
  • Place of Publication: London
  • Special Attributes: Illustrated

1891 AMERICAN INDIANS George Catlin INDIAN War SIOUX Weapon West Antique BUFFALO

1903 SAVAGE INDIANS American Indian Wars CAVALRY US Army CUSTER MASSACRE Photos

1903_SAVAGE_INDIANS_American_Indian_Wars_CAVALRY_US_Army_CUSTER_MASSACRE_Photos_01_ovd
1903 SAVAGE INDIANS American Indian Wars CAVALRY US Army CUSTER MASSACRE Photos
1903 SAVAGE INDIANS American Indian Wars CAVALRY US Army CUSTER MASSACRE Photos
1903 SAVAGE INDIANS American Indian Wars CAVALRY US Army CUSTER MASSACRE Photos
1903 SAVAGE INDIANS American Indian Wars CAVALRY US Army CUSTER MASSACRE Photos
1903 SAVAGE INDIANS American Indian Wars CAVALRY US Army CUSTER MASSACRE Photos
1903 SAVAGE INDIANS American Indian Wars CAVALRY US Army CUSTER MASSACRE Photos
1903 SAVAGE INDIANS American Indian Wars CAVALRY US Army CUSTER MASSACRE Photos
1903 SAVAGE INDIANS American Indian Wars CAVALRY US Army CUSTER MASSACRE Photos
1903 SAVAGE INDIANS American Indian Wars CAVALRY US Army CUSTER MASSACRE Photos
1903 SAVAGE INDIANS American Indian Wars CAVALRY US Army CUSTER MASSACRE Photos
1903 SAVAGE INDIANS American Indian Wars CAVALRY US Army CUSTER MASSACRE Photos
1903 SAVAGE INDIANS American Indian Wars CAVALRY US Army CUSTER MASSACRE Photos

1903 SAVAGE INDIANS American Indian Wars CAVALRY US Army CUSTER MASSACRE Photos
Note: Many of my clients are scholars and researchers seeking specific information related to their field of interest. For their convenience I include the following details directly from this book. Fremont Bull-Whacker Sweetwater River American Trooper Indian Scouts Overland State Road Agents Indian Attacks The Pony Express 1200-mile Massacre Indian Wild Horses Buffalo Railroad Trains Wild Animals Reptiles Grizzly Bears Jim Bridger Scout Guide Kit Carson Jim Baker Frontiersman Mormons Teton Sioux. Lee Humfreville, Late Captain, United States Cavalry. 10 x 8 decorated cloth hardcover. Fully Illustrated from Original Photographs. Condition: GOOD ANTIQUE CONDITION. Exterior as shown in photo. Spine rebacked by a professional book conservator, with original spine cloth laid over. Firm binding, new hinges. No torn, loose or missing pages. Front endpaper a bit rough, professionally repaired. Bookplate inside front cover. A nice example of this rare turn-of-the-century Native American title. For many military men, the end of the Civil War did not mean an end to fighting but merely a shift in the theatre of operations, from the blood-soaked battlefields of the South to Americas expanding western frontier and its burgeoning Indian problem. The author of this book, Jacob Lee Humfreville, was a Civil War veteran. In 1866, he earned a commission as a Lieutenant in the 9th U. Cavalry, one of the famous Buffalo Soldier regiments. Humfreville patrolled the untamed frontier for about 13 years, eight of them with the 9th Cavalry. In that time, he had actual personal experience and contact with most of the Plains Indian tribes west of the Mississippi the Sioux, Comanche, Apache, Blackfeet, Flatheads, the Cheyenne, Kiowa, Navajo, Pawnee, Chippewa, Nez Perces and others. He witnessed many of their dances, rituals, marriage ceremonies, funerals, etc he even accepted an invitation to attend the legendary Sun Dance of the Sioux, a rare honor for a white man. As a soldier, Humfreville also witnessed many Indian battles and attacks. He personally examined the aftermath of clashes between neighboring tribes, raids on white settlers and emigrant trains, and attacks against U. He also had personal knowledge of numerous atrocities committed by Indians against whites, and vice versa. All of this he preserves in the pages of this book, in graphic detail. Humfreville was a hardened soldier. His descriptions of the American Indians he knew are not in any way colored by romanticism or sentiment. TWENTY YEARS AMONG OUR HOSTILE INDIANS is not an ode to the noble savage. It is an even-handed, sometimes brutally honest description of the Indians as they appeared to the author, a member of 19th-century industrialized society. Humfreville writes in the Introduction. Of the small number of white men who were on the Great Plains, or in the mountains of the Far West many years ago, when each nation of Indians in its primeval state occupied its own territory or hunting ground, very few are left who knew the Indian in his absolutely wild condition ; and as none of them have described him in his untutored state, as he actually lived in his original home, I have ventured to give in this volume some of my experiences among the many nations and tribes with which I came in contact — sometimes in friendly intercourse, often in deadly strife. In this work I shall endeavor to give an accurate account of the daily life of the wild Indians, as I knew them in their natural state I shall describe the Indian as he was when I first knew him, at which time he was absolutely a wild man. I shall endeavor to give a truthful account of what came under my personal experience and observation. It will be my aim to state the truth impartially, and nothing but the truth, to portray the Indian of fact, and not the Indian of fiction. Nearly 120 years later, this book still stands as a valuable record of a vanished way of life in America. Not only because of the firsthand, eyewitness information it imparts about this countrys original inhabitants, but also because it features more than 200 very rare original photographs of actual tribal members, Indian villages and artifacts, etc.. As they existed in the mid to late 19th century. The historical importance of TWENTY YEARS AMONG OUR HOSTILE INDIANS was widely recognized even in its day. As one reviewer wrote, This is the last book that can ever be written from actual personal experience and contact, on these, the greatest and most interesting of all savages as the subject of which it treats, and the conditions of life it portrays have forever passed away. The illustrations (some 200 half tone pictures, taken from life, most of which cannot be duplicated, as the subjects no longer exist) are alone, worth many times the price of the work. This sentiment was echoed by the New York Sunday Democrat. Lee Humfreville late U. Cavalry, has contributed one of the most instructive and interesting works ever written on the North American Indian in his natural state, and it is an invaluable acquisition to American literature. And in the New York Times. It was the Captain’s experience to have faced in fight many of the various tribes he writes about. There are chapters on the Sioux Nation, on the Comanches, the Apaches, and the various tribes. All the noted encounters between the troops of the United States and the Indians are graphically described. Full space is given to the battle of Little Big Horn and the wiping out of the entire force under the lamented Custer. The adventures of some of the noted frontiersmen are given. The prints are of unusual interest. Meanwhile, the New York Journalist observed. The Indian is dying. He is dying, even as die the leaves in sad October. The tame Indian remains. The rounded-up Indian of the San Carlos and the Muscalaro reservations and some others will stay with us until they give way to that natural law which prescribes that only those who are fit to survive, will survive. The Indian of forty years ago will, early in the coming century, become as ex- tinct as the dodo. To the study of the Indian races of the continent, Capt. Lee Humfreville, late of the Uuited States Army, has devoted years of careful research. A long service in the cavalry arm brought him in close contact with all the tribes, in their natural state, untainted by civilization and in war and peace. In a very interesting volume he has given us his observation under the title, Twenty Years Among Our Hostile Indians. We would simply remark that when you have read Capt. Humfreville’s book, you have exhausted the subject. Stone, author of the Life of Sir William Johnson , and many works on American Indians, tendered this review. After a careful perusal of this work, I do not hesitate to say that no library of American history can be complete without it. Are most vivid, while the internal evidence, as shown in all of its pages bear the mark of truth. The New York Commercial Advertiser concurred. He gives his impressions in a lucid, entertaining, and thoroughly unaffected style, and what is more, m a manner which makes us feel that on the whole his conclusions are quite correct. The book is cordially commended to all who wish for first hand knowledge of the American Indian. I realize Ive included a great deal of information in this listing, but sometimes a book comes along thats so special it simply demands more attention. Below, you will find my thorough description of the books contents along with summaries of its many handsome illustrations. Throughout my description I have also inserted numerous examples of these historic images for you to observe and enjoy. CHAPTER ONE THE PATHLESS WEST OF YEARS AGO – THE NATURAL HOME OF OUR SAVAGE INDIANS – ROVERS AND FIGHTERS: The Natural Home of the Indians Their Numbers when I first knew them Their Superstition against being counted Keeping a Roster of their Fighting Men The Terrible Scourge of Small-pox Indian Dread of this Disease Leaving the Afflicted to Suffer and Die An Imposing Body of Warriors A Treacherous and Vicious Lot Visiting the Great Father at Washington Stories told by them on their Return Starting a War Party. CHAPTER TWO THE COURAGE AND FIGHTING QUALITIES OF THE WILD INDIANS – FOES THAT ASKED AND GAVE NO QUARTER: Going into Battle How the Indians Planned a Massacre Methods of Surprising their Enemies How we Defended Ourselves against Sudden Attacks Description of a Real Battle with Indians Hardships of an Indian Campaign Indian Courage and Ferocity in Battle Personal Experiences How we Felt in an Indian Battle Nerved to Desperation Mounted Indian Warriors Their Personal Appearance and Peculiar Fighting Tactics Fight to the Death Giving and Asking no Quarter Pursuing the Indians Indian Wiles and Treachery A Lurking Foe Indian War Horses How the Indians Scalped their Enemies on the Battlefield Burial of the Bodies of Troopers Burial of Indians who Fell in Battle Mourning for the Slain The Safest Place after a Massacre. CHAPTER SIX THE INDIANS’ STRANGE IDEAS OF THE HEAVENS – INDIAN CAMPS – SIGNIFICANCE OF SIGNS – WONDERFUL SKILL IN TRAILING – THE INDIAN AS A PLAINSMAN: The Milky Way Composed of the Shadows of Departed Spirits The Road of Departed Spirits Their Idea of Thunder and Lightning The Aurora Borealis Lighting the Road of the Spirits to the Happy Hunting Ground Reverence for the Dead Placing the Dead in Trees Providing Food for the Spirits to eat Final Departure of the Spirits from the Corpse Indian Camps Surrounded by Filth Broken Bones Care of Wounds Indian Fortitude No Regular Time for Eating or Sleeping How they set their Lodges and made their Camps Drinking Dirty Water Signs Everything a Sign to an Indian The most important Thing to all Indians Skill in Trailing Punishment for Crimes Lack of Muscular Strength No Match for the White Man in Personal Encounter. CHAPTER SEVEN HOW INDIANS COOKED AND ATE – THEIR LOVE OF FINERY AND PERSONAL ADORNMENT – PAINTING THEIR FACES AND BODIES – MAKING A WILL PLAINSCRAFT: Cooking Pots made of Fresh Hides Eating Raw Meat from newly-slain Animals A Meal twenty-four hours long A Daily Gorge Insatiable Appetites First-class Gluttons Eating Skins and Moccasins Their first Coffee Indian Improvidence A Chief’s Powers and Limitations The Chief in Camp and on the War-path Forming a new Tribe The Survival of the Fittest Love of Ornament Fondness for Soldiers’ cast-off Uniforms and High Hats Aversion to wearing Trousers Fashion of Painting the Face and Body Indian Dandies Indian Artists How an Indian made his Will Distribution of Property before Death Reading the Signs of an Abandoned Camp Plainscraft. CHAPTER NINE INDIAN AMUSEMENTS AND PASTIMES – THEIR THIRST FOR GAMBLING – THEIR GAMES OF SKILL AND CHANCE – EXPERTNESS IN THROWING A KNIFE: The Indian’s Limited Amusements Horse-racing the Favorite Pastime Betting on the Results Women Gamblers Ball Playing Skill of the Players How the Game was Played Proficiency in Running and Jumping Skill in Throwing the Knife Indian Music and Musical Instruments Serenading Dusky Maidens The Romance of Indian Youth Admiring Himself in Nature’s Looking-glass Lack of Amusements and Pastimes in Winter. CHAPTER TEN INDIAN WOMEN TANNERS THE MAKING OF AN INDIAN LODGE INDIAN ART AND ARTISTS AN INDIAN VILLAGE ON THE MOVE: Indian Tepees and Camps How Lodge Covers were made Lodge Poles Erecting Lodges The Entrance Suffering from Cold Going Barefoot in the Snow Decorating the Lodge Cover Deeds of Valor recorded in Picture Writing Some well Executed Drawings Going to bed with their Clothes on Interior Arrange- ment of a Lodge Expert Horsewomen Dexterity in throwing the Lasso Packing the Animals The Travois Adjusting the Pack How the Old, Infirm, and Children were Transported A Village on the Move A Strange Sight Crossing Streams Clothing that was never Cleansed A Filthy Race The Art of Packing Animals How Pack Animals were prevented from lying down. CHAPTER ELEVEN THE SIGN LANGUAGE – ITS MYSTERIOUS ORIGIN AND SIGNIFICANCE – COMMUNICATION BY SIGNALS: Indian Languages Their Strange Diversity No two Indian Nations known to Converse in the Language of the Other The Sign Language Its Mysterious Origin The Arapaho, Sioux, Cheyenne, and Navajo Languages Significance of the Sign Language Sign Language by Horse Riding The Sign Language of the Hands Difficult Sentence in the Sign Language An Incident in my own Experience Sign Language by Movements of the Horse Sign Language by the Mirror Sign Language by Smoke Communicating at Long Distance How an Indian Wrote a Letter Hieroglyphics on the Faces of Rocks in Texas Rude Drawing in Caves Difficulty of Intrepreting them. CHAPTER TWELVE THE INDIAN AS A FIGHTER – HIS BRAVERY AND CONTEMPT OF DEATH – A CUNNING, STEALTHY, AND TREACHEROUS FOE: Born Fighters The Indian’s Contempt of Death His Great Courage Fighting and Hunting His only Occupations Not easily Surprised or Ambushed Indian Method of Preparing for Battle Return of a War Party Re-enacting the War-like Scene Treatment of Captives Prolonging the Torture Effect of Firearms on the Primeval Indian How the Indian first secured Firearms Horse-stealing considered a Virtue Indian Lack of Inventiveness Articles that have never been improved on The Snowshoe, Moccasin, Tepee, and Bow and Arrow Great Buoyancy of their Canoes. CHAPTER THIRTEEN THE INDIAN’S NATURAL WEAPONS AND HOW HE USED THEM – TEACHING YOUNG BRAVES – INDIAN WARFARE: Indian Weapons of War and of the Chase The Indian War Club The Tomahawk The Scalping Knife The Lance and Shield The Bow and Arrow How they were made Dexterity of the Indian in the Use of the Bow His Lack of Proficiency in the Use of Modern Firearms His Limited Use of Tools Boys Practicing with Bow and Arrow Securing their first Firearms The Indian not a Good Rifle Shot Sham Battles A Realistic and Exciting Exhibition Their Decorations and Equipment How the Young Brave Acquired a Knowledge of War Dexterity in Rescuing their Wounded during Battle His thorough Mastery of his Horse. CHAPTER FOURTEEN AN INDIAN DOG FEAST – FINGERS VERSUS FORKS – AN INDIAN DINNER PARTY – PERSONAL EXPERIENCES: Why the Indians were Nomadic A Dog Feast Cooked in its Skin with the Hair on How the Favorite Dish Tastes Its Peculiar Flavor Giving a Dinner to a Famous Chief Astonished Indians Eating all Night Indians with “Good Hearts” A Perfect Gorge Eating with their Fingers Refusing to use Knives and Forks A Delicate Meal Speech of a Great Chief “Wacpominie” What it consisted of Old-Man-Afraid-of-His-Horses An Embarrassment of Riches Some Valuable Presents Disagreeable Pests Manner of Ridding Skins of Vermin A Pertinent Conversation with a Chief and his Significant Reply The Grossest Insult known to the Sioux. CHAPTER FIFTEEN BURIAL OF THE DEAD – STRANGE FUNERAL RITES AND CEREMONIES – THE INDIAN’S IDEA OF THE FUTURE STATE – LIFE IN THE SPIRIT LAND: Funeral Ceremonies Burial of a Chief Last Rites Final Resting-Place of their Important Personages Buried in a Sitting Posture Scaffolds on which the Dead were placed How they were thrown down by Buffalo Taken by the Whites for Fuel Killing Animals at the Funeral Women and Female Children buried in various ways Dead Bodies eaten by Carnivorous Animals and Birds of Prey Intolerable Stench at an Indian Burial-Place Journey of the Soul to the Spirit Land The Indian’s Inability to Compute Time Feeding the Soul during its Journey Belief that the Spirit left the Body through the Mouth Why Indians Mutilated the Slain Bodies of Enemies Execution of Big Foot, Black Crow, and others by hanging in Chains Death in its most Dreaded Form. CHAPTER SIXTEEN THE GREAT SIOUX NATION – A FIERCE AND WARLIKE PEOPLE – LIFE AND SCENES AMONG THEM: One of the Largest and Most Warlike of Indian Nations Old-Man-Afraid-of-His Horses A Noted Chief How he acquired his Name How he became Famous When and how a Brave could change his Name A Nation of Meat Eaters Their Manner of Cooking and Eating The Universal Dirty Cooking Pot A Voracious Sioux Drinking Dish Water Why Indians were constantly on the Move Always at War with their Neighbors Why they had no Intoxicating Liquors Insulting an Indian by asking his Name Indian Vulgarity Indian Mothers-in-law How they were regarded An Indian Forlorn Hope An Alliance that meant Death and Destruction Splendid Horsemanship The Stone Bath Practice of Voodooism Heroic Treatment Wealthy Indians Many Ceremonies Demonstrative Love No Social Castes Dog Soldiers Widely Separated Tribes Superstitious fear of Hailstorms. CHAPTER SEVENTEEN STILL AMONG THE SIOUX – THE MANDANS – INDIAN FREE MASONS – THE ASSINIBOINS – THE GROS VENTRES, OR THE BIG BELLIES, CUISSES BRULES OR BURNT THIGHS: The Mandans Their Interesting History Nearly Exterminated by Small-Pox Indian Free Masons A Great Mystery How did they Acquire a Knowledge of the Order? CHAPTER NINETEEN THE COMANCHES – CONTINUED PUNISHMENT INFLICTED ON THEIR WOMEN – STEALING CONSIDERED A FINE ART: Comanche Home Life A Nation of Thieves Polygamy common among them Miser- able Women Never known to Marry outside of their own People What made them unusually Virtuous Severe Penalty for Unfaithfulness Slitting the Nose Self-inflicted Wounds Mourning for the Dead Superstitious Healing of the Sick Their Medicines Curing the Bite of a Rattlesnake Capturing Wild Horses Killing Wild Turkeys Their Scanty Clothing A Filthy and Repulsive People Feats of Horsemanship Cutting the Hamstring of a Running Animal Mothers at Twelve Years of Age Making up a Party for Plunder and Pillage Living in Rocks and Caves Expert Thieves Stealing considered a Mark of Honor. CHAPTER TWENTY THE APACHES – APPALLING RECORD – THEIR STEALTH AND CUNNING: In the Country of the Apaches Shaving off the Nose of a Woman Horrible Mutilations Apache Depredations The Ishmaelites of all Men Their Repulsive and Hideous Appearance Their Small and Peculiar Feet Painting Themselves with Mud An Unspeakably Dirty People Swarming with Vermin Murderous Warriors Art of Concealing their Persons How they Made Themselves Resemble a Rock Looking like a Bunch of Grass Mistaken for a Bush or Shrub Their Stealth and Cunning On the Warpath Return of a War Party Thievish and Cruel Propensities An Appalling Record Driving Out Ten Thousand Settlers Hiding in the Dense Jungles. CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE THE APACHES CONTINUED – ELUSIVE, CUNNING AND DARING INDIANS – EXPERT TRAIL FOLLOWERS – INDIAN LIFE IN TEXAS, NEW MEXICO, AND ARIZONA: Expert Trailers Detecting Signs Concealing their own Trail Their Cunning in eluding Pursuit Apache Cruelty to Captives Fate of Captive White Boys and Girls How the Apaches Lived Great Aversion to Telling their Names Queer Superstitions Burying their Dead at Night Their Fear of a Dead Body Traveling One Hundred Miles a Day on Foot Marvelous Endurance Victorious in Capturing Trains Raiding Settlers Bones of Victims An Able but Vicious Chief The Deadly Fear He Inspired Attacking Ranch and Cattle Men Dreadful Fate of a Mexican Captive Stripped, and Staked out on the Ground over an Ant Hill A Horrible Death Midnight Groans and Screams The Story of a Noted Chief’s First Raid as Told by Himself. Death of the Head of the Family Destruction of his Property Birth of a Child Treating the Sick Their Food. Clothing, and Arms Eating Rats. Mice, Crickets and Snakes The Pah-Utes and the Pi-Utes A Miserable Lot of Red Men. CHAPTER TWENTY-THREE THE SNAKES AND ROOT DIGGERS – INTERESTING AND PECULIAR TRIBE – LOAFERS AND GAMBLERS: The Snakes a Part of the Shoshonee Nation An Interesting Tribe Their Hunting Ground Afflicted with Goitre Necks Larger than their Heads Their Great Enmity with the Cheyennes, Blackfeet and Sioux A Crafty, Treacherous Tribe Their Fiendish Cruelty to Prisoners How they Secured Firearms Manner of Wearing their Hair Their Poverty Securing Wild Horses Their Expertness as Boatmen Description of a Bull-Boat Ingenuity of the Snakes Manner of Catching Fish Lazy Fishermen Their Expertness in the Use of the Sign Language Communication by Means of Horses, Fire, and Smoke The Bannocks, or Root Diggers A Miserable People Loafers and Gamblers. CHAPTER TWENTY-FIVE THE BLACKFEET – THE SMALL-POX EPIDEMIC – APPALLING SCENES OF DEATH AND DESOLATION – A CAMP OF HUMAN BONES AND DESERTED LODGES: The Blackfeet Indians How they got their Name Their Country The Neighbors with whom they were at War The Piegans, Bloods, and Gros Ventres of the Prairie Their Standing Grudge against the American Fur Companies Trapping under Difficulties How Trappers Protected themselves against the Indians Unwritten Laws of the Blackfeet Their Superstition against Fish Their Religious Beliefs and Burial Ceremonies Flight of the Spirit Manner of Feeding the Spirit The Dual Spirit Carrying out Dreams The Small-Pox Epidemic How it Gained a Foothold Fearful Ravages How they Treated this Dread Disease Fifteen Hundred Lodges and their Dead Abandoned Appalling Scenes of Death and Desolation Small-Pox Corpses Eaten by Wolves. CHAPTER TWENTY-SIX THE CROWS, OR UPSORUKA AS THEY CALLED THEMSELVES JAMES BECKWOURTH, THE FAMOUS MULATTO FRONTIERSMAN LIFE AMONG THE CROWS: The Crows Driven out by the Sioux A Skulking, Thievish Race A Tall and Athletic People Their Flowing Hair The Crow Women How the Crows Attacked Trappers and Traders Murdering Entire Expeditions Night Attacks The Home of the Beaver, Otter, and other Fur-Bearing Animals The Famous Mulatto Trapper, Jim Beckwourth His Alliance with the Crows His Great Influence among Them His Return to St. Louis and Supposed Death Effect of the Rumor on the Crows A Bloody Tragedy Averted Reappearance of Beckwourth A Brave and Sagacious Man A Warrior Race Bitterness between the Crows and Sioux What Happens after Death. CHAPTER THIRTY THE DIRTY AND POVERTY-STRICKEN ARAPAHOES – A SHIFTLESS AND LAZY PEOPLE – HOW THEY LIVED – BEGGARS, MENIALS, AND THIEVES: Where did the Arapahoes come from? CHAPTER THIRTY-ONE CLIFF DWELLERS – THE NAVAJOES AND THEIR COUNTRY – THE TONKAWAYS – THEIR WARS AND WANDERINGS CANNIBALISM AMONG THE INDIANS: How the Navajoes Resembled White Men in their Habits A Tribe of Cliff Dwellers Their Famous Blankets Their Handiwork and Skill Horsehair Lariats Beautiful Earthen Ware How they Purified and Cooled Water How the Cactus was used for Clearing Water Peculiarity of the Cactus Leaf Personal Appearance of the Navajoes Children Adepts in Throwing the Lasso An Expert Indian Lad of Ten His Feats with the Lasso Catching a Dog by either Leg The Navajoe in his Family A Model Indian Deserted Dwellings The Tonkaways A Remnant of a once Powerful People Their Vague Traditions Their Wars and Wan- derings A Cannibal Race Killing and Eating their Prisoners. Why did they keep to themselves? Supposed to be Christians, but in reality Heathen Their Ugly Idols A Mooted Question Why they were made so Ugly Smashing them to Pieces Putting an Idol to a Queer Use Using a God for a Liquor Flask Homeliness an Antidote for Pain Where have the Pueblos Gone? An Unsolved Mystery Walled Caves and Ruins of Stone Dwellings A Lost Art How did they make Cement? The Zunis How They Lived Their Numerous Flocks and Herds A Strange People Praying to the Spirits of Ocean The Pimas or Papagoes Buried in a sitting Posture Feasting at the Grave Praying for a New Husband Tar as a Cosmetic. CHAPTER THIRTY-THREE THE PAWNEES – A NATION WHOSE ORIGIN IS UNKNOWN – FEUDS AND FIERCE BATTLES – SKINNING A MAN ALIVE TRIBES CONSTITUTING THE NATION: Once a Numerous and Warlike People Peculiar Manner of Cutting their Hair Their Hunting Ground Natural Home of the Buffalo Jealousies and Feuds Created in Hunting Them Hated by all their Neighbors Hatred of the Sioux Ambition of the Sioux to be Known as a Pawnee Killer Vicious Tribes traveling a long way to Fight the Pawnees Vindictiveness Skinning a Man Alive Pawnee Religion Priests and Doctors Medicine Bags Widows of the Pawnees The Wichitas. CHAPTER THIRTY-FIVE THE NEZ PERCES, OR PIERCED-NOSED INDIANS – ON THE WARPATH – SURRENDER OF CHIEF JOSEPH – THE CAYUSES: A Part of the Shahaptin Family – How the Nez Perces were first Discovered Their Pierced Noses – An Intelligent Tribe White Squatters First Outbreak against the Whites Going on the Warpath Organizing a Bloody Campaign A Fierce Battle Indian Tactics Troops in Pursuit Peculiar Incident of the Battle Birth of a Child during the Engagement Chief Joseph His Daughter Lost in the Confusion of Battle Devoured by Wild Animals The Chief’s only Heir His Wonderful Retreat of Two Thousand Miles His Military Ability Indians Fighting with their Clothes On Rare Instance of Indian Magnanimity Surrender of Chief Joseph Asking no Favors His Patriotic Speech The Cayuses Low, Cunning Great Thieves. CHAPTER THIRTY-SEVEN THE COLUMBIAN GROUP – THE STORY OF AN INDIAN QUEST FOR THE WHITE MAN’S BIBLE – INDIAN ATROCITIES: A Brave but Peaceably Inclined People Ceremonies when Preparing for the Warpath Imitating the Cry of Birds and Wild Animals The War Chief How Braves were Enlisted for War Treatment of Women among the Different Tribes Indian Slaves and Slavery Staking Wives and Children on Games of Chance A Risky Profession Burial Ceremonies A Vicious Tribe Called the Rogues Why they were so named An Expedition in Search of the White Man’s Bible Father De Smet His Life and Labors among the Indians The Measles among the Indians Destruction of the Protestant Mission Savage Instincts Aroused An Expedition for the Rescue of Captives. CHAPTER THIRTY-EIGHT THE GREAT INDIAN NATIONS: Their Marked Characteristics and Radically Different Languages The Great Algonquin Family Their Widely Separated Tribes Names of the Different Tribes The Apalachees or Mobiles, Often Called the Southern Indians Names of the Tribes The Athabaskees Names of the Tribes The Lacotah or Sioux Names of Tribes The Shoshone Nation Names of Tribes Constituting this Nation The Shahaptin Family and its Tribes The Salish Family The Chinooks The Haidahs The California Tribes The Pueblos The Columbian Group Names of Tribes The Pawnees Their Obscure Origin The Miscellaneous Tribes, of whose Origin Little or Nothing is Known. CHAPTER THIRTY-NINE THE SUN DANCE OF THE SIOUX – THE GREATEST OF ALL INDIAN CEREMONIES – SELF-INFLICTED WOUNDS AND AGONIZING TORTURE – A TERRIBLE ORDEAL: The Greatest of all Indian Ceremonies I find myself in Favor with the Indians and take Advantage of it Obtain Permission to Witness a Sun Dance Assurance that I should not be Molested Precautionary Measures An animated Scene A Moving Mass of Animal Life Preparations for the Dance Selecting the Sun Pole Awaiting the Rising of the Sun Painted Warriors on their best Horses A Wild Dash around the Sun Pole The Dance formally begun Scenes in Camp during the First Day Wonderful Endurance First Night of the Dance Left Naked and Destitute on the Prairie Horrible Self-Torture Slitting Open both Breasts Inserting a Lariat through the Slits A Dreadful Ordeal. CHAPTER FORTY – THE SCALP DANCE AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE – GHASTLY TROPHIES OF MASSACRE AND WAR – THE WAR DANCE AND ITS OBJECT – GREWSOME TRINKETS WORN: The Scalp Dance Treatment of Scalps Scalp Poles Description of the Dance A Strange Place to make Love Courting an Indian Maiden The Scalp Dance next in Importance to the Sun Dance Excitement of the Dancers Telling how the Scalp was taken Exhibition of Trophies The Scalp the Unmistakable Evidence of having killed an Enemy Indian Braggarts Notorious Liars The War Dance Dohertys Description Its Object Organizing a War Party Encouraging the Braves to Join Praying for their Safe Return Feasting on Dogs Prayers of the Old Women The Medicine Dance What it was and why it was held The Medicine Bag Nations who used it Mystery of the Medicine Bag Disinclination of Indians to talk about it Grewsome Trinkets Worn The Fire Dance The Snake Dance. CHAPTER FORTY-ONE – ORIGIN OF THE NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS – WHERE DID THEY COME FROM – INTERESTING THEORIES – A QUESTION NEVER SOLVED: The Indians of North America Ingenious Theories of their Origin Claimed to be of Mongolian, Africa, and Hebrew Descent Did they Descend from the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel? Different Theories Difference between the Indians and Hebrews, Chinamen, and Negroes Curious Analogies My Own Opinion Why I think that the Indian was Placed here by our Great Creator A Distinct Race Entirely Unlike any other Old-Man-Afraid-of-his-Horses’ Logical Reasoning Mountains and Rivers in the Moon Did they cross over from Asia by way of Bering’s Straits? The Mound Builders Implements found in the Mounds Their Art in Cutting Precious Stones Exquisite Gold Images from their Graves Conclusion as to the Origin of the Red Man. CHAPTER FORTY-TWO INDIAN MASSACRES AND BATTLES – THRILLING INCIDENTS OF FRONTIER LIFE – TRAGEDIES OF THE MOUNTAINS AND PLAINS: Indian Warfare Attacking Field Pieces with Tomahawks Burial of Massacred Troops Burial of Dead Warriors The Fetterman Massacre Reserving the Last Shot for Themselves How Information about this Bloody Affair was Obtained Firing the Station with Burning Arrows Killing a Lurking Foe Blowing the top of an Indian’s Head off Our Battle on Tongue River A Desperate Charge A Trooper’s Grim Remark A Fierce Indian Battle Two able Leaders How they described other Battles and Massacres. CHAPTER FORTY-THREE – THE MASSACRE OF GENERAL CANBY BY THE MODOCS – CAPTAIN JACK AND SCAR-FACED CHARLIE – INDIAN TREACHERY – PUNISHMENT OF THE MURDERERS: War between the Modocs and their Neighbors Inexperienced Agents Surprising Captain Jack’s Camp Fight between the Modocs and the Troops Massacre of White Settlers by the Modocs Avenging the Massacre Thirty Soldiers Killed, and not an Indian Injured The Peace Commission General Canby Chosen Sullen and Angry Indians Schonochin His Hatred of the Whites Waiting for Revenge Ben Wright’s Inhuman Massacre of the Modocs A Bloody Day Scar-faced Charlie His Friendship for the Whites Treachery Suspected Danger Ahead The Indians Indicted for Murder Captain Jack’s Retreat to the Lava Beds A Conference sought with him Falling into a Trap Going to the Meeting Unarmed Massacre of General Canby and his Party Capture and Punishment of the Murderers. CHAPTER FORTY-FOUR A FRONTIER TRAGEDY – GENERAL OUSTER’S LAST FIGHT – HIS DEATH, AND THE ANNIHILATION OF HIS ENTIRE COMMAND – NARRATIVE OF RED HORSE, A SIOUX CHIEF: Custer’s Annihilation The Country alive with Hostile Indians Who was Sitting Bull? An Indian Camp of Ten Thousand Men, Women, and Children Striking the Enemy Chief Gall An Able Indian Leader The Battle of the Little Big Horn Custer’s Fatal Mistake A Desperate and Bloody Battle Where was General Custer? Discovering the Bodies of the Slain A Pile of Empty Cartridge Shells beside each Corpse Coming to the Rescue Burying the Dead Appearance of the Slain Their Pained and Terrified Expressions Rain-in-the-Face His vow to Cut Out the Heart of Captain Thomas Custer Sitting Bull a Great Liar, a Wily Old Rascal My Interview with Rain-in-the-Face An Indian Account of the Battle by Red Horse, a Sioux Chief. CHAPTER FORTY-FIVE THE GREAT SIOUX MASSACRE – MIRACULOUS ESCAPES AND THRILLING ADVENTURES – SUFFERINGS OF CAPTIVES: Cause of the Massacre War of Extermination decided upon by the Indians They take the Warpath Their First Attack Courage of a French Ferryman His Heroic Death Killing Fleeing Settlers Hacked to Pieces with Knives Children’s Brains Beaten Out Burned Alive Hung on Hooks Sticks Driven through their Bodies Mutilation of the Dead Roasting a Child Alive Thrilling Escapes Two Brothers trying to Save a Sick Mother The Settlers Rally for Defense Holding White Prisoners Their Extreme Suffering Miraculous Escape of Two Brothers Six Hundred and Forty-four Settlers and Ninety-three Soldiers Slain. CHAPTER FORTY-SEVEN FAMOUS EXPEDITIONS INTO THE INDIAN COUNTRY – PERILOUS JOURNEYS OVERLAND BY OX TEAMS AND PRAIRIE SCHOONERS: Expedition of Lieutenants Lewis and Clark Preparations for the Journey Their First Winter in a Wild and Unknown Country Assistance from Friendly Indians Meeting the Snakes Explorations of Lieutenants Pike and Long Capture of Lieutenant Pike and Party Expedition of Captain Bonneville Battles with the Early Traders Gold Discoveries The Rush to the Mines Fremont’s Expedition The Santa Fe Trail Prairie Schooners A Dangerous Trip Excitement in the Pike’s Peak Country An Overland Wagon Train Waylaid by Indians How Wagon Trains were Corraled Fighting against Odds The Great American Bull-Whacker His Whip and Skill in Using It An Incident on the Sweetwater River An Astonished Indian. CHAPTER FORTY-EIGHT THE AMERICAN TROOPER AS AN INDIAN FIGHTER – PERILOUS SERVICE – SCOUTING FOR INDIANS: Fighting Indians with Cannon Their Amazement at, and Dread of Shells An Inscrutable Mystery Fighting them after their own Fashion The best Soldiers in the World Hand-to-Hand Conflict with the Indians Fighting on Foot Keeping with the Command Blowing their own Brains Out As Mild as a Child but as full of Fight as a Tiger Fighting Indians Day by Day Sleepless Nights On a Scout How the Trooper Slept at Night A Duel between two Soldiers A Sad Incident After the Duel Toes, Fingers, and Hands Frozen Animals Frozen to Death Unwelcome Night Visitors Grizzly Bears in Camp The Despised Wolves Cunning and Dangerous Animals Eating Boots and Saddles Eating their Companions Alive Horses and Mules Crazed by Fright. CHAPTER FORTY-NINE THE OVERLAND STAGE – DESPERADOES AND ROAD AGENTS AN INDIAN ATTACK THAT COVERED TWELVE HUNDRED MILES: The Overland Stage Line How the Line was Operated A Hundred Miles in Twenty-four Hours Its Extraordinary Service Prey for Indians and Road Agents Frequent Raids on the Stage Stations Looting the Stages Road Agents Jules Bevi and his Tragic Death Killed by the Noted Desperado, Alfred Slade Cutting Off his Victim’s Ears Nailing One of them to the Door Dangling the Other from his Watch Chain The Worst White Man in that Country His Misdeeds His Visit to my Camp A Heeded Warning In the Hands of the Vigilantes Execution of Slade and his two Comrades Dying like Cowards A Massacre that Extended Twelve Hundred Miles The Wonderful Mirage. CHAPTER FIFTY THE PONY EXPRESS – A DANGEROUS SERVICE IN A DANGEROUS COUNTRY- WONDERFUL ENDURANCE AND DARING FEATS OF THE RIDERS: Riding on Horseback from the Missouri River to the Pacific Ocean in Ten Days A Bucking Pony A Vicious Beast Bleeding from the Nose, Mouth, Eyes, and Ears Courage and Daring of Pony Express Riders Running the Gauntlet for Hundreds of Miles among Hostile Indians and Murderous Road Agents Exhaustion of the Riders Unable to Dismount Incidents and Experiences Riding Night and Day The Fastest and Longest Ride ever made Wonderful Endurance How the News of Abraham Lincoln’s Inauguration was carried across the Continent Taking a Dead Man’s Place Dangers by the way Pursued Safe at last Physical Strain of Long Horseback Riding A Personal Experience My Escort A never-to-be-forgotten Ride A Country alive with Wild and Frenzied Warriors The Electric Telegraph. CHAPTER FIFTY-ONE WILD HORSES – WHERE THEY CAME FROM – HOW THEY WERE CAPTURED AND SUBDUED: Wild Horses First Known in America in 1518 Indians’ Astonishment at first seeing a Horse and Rider The Wild Horse’s Struggle for Existence during the Cold Winter Indian’s Mode of Securing them Their Cruelty to them Their Great Abundance in Early Days The White Man’s Method of Securing them “Creasing” Walking them down From Twenty-four to Thirty-six Hours Necessary to Accomplish it Difficulty in Breaking them. CHAPTER FIFTY-TWO KILLING BUFFALOES – AN EXCITING AND DANGEROUS SPORT – “BUCK AGUE” – GREEN SPORTSMEN – PERSONAL EXPERIENCES AND REMINISCENCES: Millions of Buffaloes Indispensable to the Indians How Wolves Attacked and Killed them Why did they always cross in Front of a Railroad Train? Buffalo Gnats Stinging the Animals to Fury Buffalo Chips The only Fuel on the Plains Guests Deceived Eaten Alive by Wolves The Latter’s Unearthly Howls Excitement of a Buffalo Hunt A Thrilling Spectacle Horses as Buffalo Hunters Dashing into the Herd A Shower of Stones and Earth Dangerous Sport for a Verdant Shooting the Animal through the Ears Inexperienced Hunters Teaching them to Hunt Shooting his own Horse An Astonished Sportsman Danger of being Trampled to Death Buck Ague Its Effects. CHAPTER FIFTY-THREE WILD ANIMALS AND REPTILES OF THE PLAINS AND MOUNTAINS – THE DEADLY RATTLESNAKE AND ITS HABITS – FUR- BEARING ANIMALS AND THEIR WAYS: The Rattlesnake Its Deadly Bite Its One Good Trait Its Sickening Odor Coiling for a Spring Planner of Striking How Deer Killed the Rattler The Rattler’s Only Redeeming Quality How the Peccary and Hog Killed Snakes How the Blacksnake Killed the Rattler The Pisano or Road Runner Its Method of Killing Rattlers The Bull-Whacker’s Method The Prairie Dog and its Habitation What it Lived on Its Domicile Invaded by Rattlers and Screech Owls The Antelope and its Habits Its Fatal Curiosity The Elk The Moose Use of his Flag Horns The Black-Tailed Deer The White-Tailed Deer The Beaver A Born Architect Their Beds A Sagacious and Industrious Animal Gnawing Feet off to Gain their Freedom The Otter. CHAPTER FIFTY-FOUR BEARS AND THEIR WAYS – ADVENTURES WITH GRIZZLIES – AN EXCITING FIGHT AND A RACE FOR LIFE: The Black Bear Its Home, Habits and Food Fondness for Honey Tenacity of Life The Bear as a Boxer How Indians Secured Them Four Bears Equal to One Scalp Tearing out the Entrails of a Dog at one Blow The Cinnamon Bear Its Peculiarities A Puzzle to Naturalists The Grizzly Bear The Largest and Most Formidable Bear in Existence Its Awkward Gait Why the Grizzly was called “Sambo” Avoided by Mountaineers Indians Killing a Grizzly A Memorable Fight With a Grizzly Starting Him Up in the Underbrush An Exciting Time An Enraged Bear The Fight On A Race for Life A Narrow Escape Tormented by Dogs Fourteen Bullets in Sambo’s Body Killed at Last. CHAPTER FIFTY-FIVE JIM BRIDGER, FAMOUS SCOUT, GUIDE, FRONTIERSMAN, AND INDIAN FIGHTER – PERSONAL EXPERIENCES WITH HIM: A Typical Frontiersman Trapper, and Famous Indian Fighter An Unerring Guide His Skill as a Trailer The Man who Trained Kit Carson Bridger’s Wit and Humor Some Characteristic Anecdotes The Invisible Mountain A Thrilling and Fatal Adventure Telling the Story of his own Death Bridger’s Strange Manner of Living Unable to Read, but could Quote from Shakespeare A High-Priced Book Bridget at the Battle of Powder River “A Mean Camp” His Visit to the President What Bridger thought of Him A Gang of Desperadoes Discomfited My Winter with Him His Queer Habits Going to Bed at all Hours Cooking his Meals in the Middle of the Night Singing “Injun” Bridger in Battle with the Utes, Killing and Scalping a Ute in a Hand-to-Hand Conflict Challenging an Arapahoe What Followed. CHAPTER FIFTY-SIX A FAMOUS FRONTIERSMAN, TRAPPER, SCOUT AND GUIDE – A WHITE MAN WHO HAD A SNAKE WOMAN AND LIVED THE INDIAN LIFE MANY YEARS – HIS ADVENTURES AND EXPLOITS: Jim Baker a Noted Character Wanders into the Snake Tribe Lives With a Snake Woman and Adopts the Clothing and the Life of the Snakes A Desperate Fight with Indians Fleeced by Gamblers His Fortitude Adventures with a Party of Miners Discovers Gold Attacked by Indians Fighting Indians Step by Step for a Hundred Miles The Killed and Wounded His Deadly Rifle Hatred of the Mormons A Perilous Journey Concealed by Day and Traveling by Night. PHOTOS INCLUDE: Portrait of the Author Frontispiece Teton Sioux Jumping Dog Ogalala Sioux A Typical Indian Village Skin Covered Lodges Spotted Wolf Typical Chippewa Warrior with Bear Claw Necklace War Painting Medicine Man in Mourning Showing manner of Cutting the Hair for Mourning Many Horns, Gros Ventre Indian, with Ear Pendants of Iroquois shells tipped with Large Shell Red Cloud, the noted Sioux Chief The One who hits the Bear With Red Stone Pipe and Pipe Stem Decorated with Scalps Blackfoot Indian The Challenge The Tail of the Scalp Lock thrown over the Head, indicating “Take it” Comanche Warrior Gap in the Salt White Thunder in Mourning Iroquois shell Ear Pendants Painting on Bodies Peculiar manner of Cutting the Hair Pipe Tomahawk Buckskin Shirt with Indian Drawing Indian Drawing on Tanned Deer Skin Lodge and Wind Break Baby Carrier Ornamented with Bead work in various Colors Cheyenne Sioux Warrior in Mourning Child’s Rattle and Quirt Whistling Bear Brule Sioux Kiowa Lodge Indian Travois Blackfoot Kicking Bear’s Camp Sioux Indian Bark House Bull-Boat of the Northwest Snowshoes of the Blackfeet Little Kiowa Girl with Doll War Club Ornamented with Brass-headed Nails Bear Claw Necklace Decoration on End of Buckskin Shirt Sleeves Facial Painting Minneconjoux Sioux Lance and Belt Sioux. Dog Soldier Insignia Scaffold Graves on the Plains Sioux Platte River Spotted Tail and Wife Number Two The Noted Chief of the Ogalala Sioux Tree Grave Brule Sioux Republican River Mandan Burial Place, Dish with Food for the Spirit Slow Bull Typical Sioux Sioux Camp on the Yellowstone River Barbed Arrow Head Sioux Little Wound War Bonnet decorated with Scalps on End of Feathers, Beaded Leggings and Moccasins, Red Stone Pipe and Ornamented Stem Group of Sioux Woman on Right. Showing Manner of Sitting on the Legs Good Hawk, in full Ceremonial Costume Sioux Sioux Camp Shield on Tripod with Scalp Hanging from the Center Sweat House of the Sioux Neetmoks Medicine Medicine Man Making Medicine Typical Indian Saddle Warrior in full Mourning Sioux Woman Shirt Ornamented with Deer Hoofs Zin-Tha Kin-Yan (Flying Bird) Typical Sioux Tobacco Pouch, Leggings and Moccasins Ornamented with Beads of Various Colors Story Telling Sioux Mandan Indian Chief with Big War Bonnet Full Dress Beaded Leggings and Moccasins, Tomahawk, Sioux Wash-Ona-Koora, Rushing War Eagle Bear Claw Necklace Mandan Sioux Sioux Camp at Agency Ta-To-Kain-You-Ka, Running Antelope, Typical Brule Sioux Brule Sioux with War Bonnet Ma-To-Shi-Sha Wicked Bear War Bonnet Decorated with Scalps on Tips of Feathers, Sioux Ma-To-Yeu-Mni Ogalala, Three Bears and War Bonnet Sioux Yankton Sioux in their Homes Spotted Dog Sioux Bloody Mouth, Uncpapa Sioux Group of Sioux in Ceremonial Dress Iron Face Omaha Indian of Rank Insignia of Hand on Bead Ornamented Cap Chief of the Omahas Wife of Chevers, Comanche Horse Back’s Camp Comanche Woman Mounted Comanche Woman Comanche Lodges Loco. Chief of the Warm Spring Apaches Typical Apache Warrior Warm Spring Apache Wood Arrow Head Geronimo. Chief of the Apaches Various Indian Characters in Arizona Typical Arizona Indians Children’s Toys Ouray Arrow Ute Chief Stone Knife Ute Camp. Los Pinos Ute Family Man and Three Wives Pi-Ute Habitation Typical Snake Indian Bannock Family at Home Man with Three Wives Blackfoot Chief Headdress of Eagle Feathers Typical Warrior Chopped Up Piegan Wild Warrior Large Ear Pendants Eagle Feathers Tipped with Scalps In Scalplock Crow Lodges Child’s Rattle Kiowa Camp Arkansas River Feather Wolf Typical Cheyenne Warrior Crazy Head and Spotted Wolf Cheyennes Stone Calf and Wife Cheyennes Starving Elk Typical Cheyenne Warrior Cheyenne Warrior in full War Costume Medicine Staff and Medicine Arrows Cheyenne Typical Plains Indian Arrowhead made from a Root Arapahoe Lodge Drying Meat Typical Navajoe Navajoe Woman Weaving Navajoe in War Costume Navajoe Warrior Cebra Negra Navajoe Manner of Wearing the Hair, Zunis Females Group of Indians with Bear Claw Necklaces Pawnee Village Pawnee Warriors Manner of Wearing the Hair Pawnee Habitations Mud Houses Pawnee Warrior Full War Costume Group of Pawnee Braves Reed Habitation, Decorated Indian Little Shell Typical Chippewa Ornamented Otter Skin Medicine Bag Wooden Arrowhead Bear Claw Necklace, Head Covering made of Skins, Horsehair Ornamentation, Sac and Fox Full Buckskin Dress, ornamented with Beads and Fringes Nez Perc Warrior Thunder-Rolling-in-the-Mountains, otherwise Chief Joseph Nez Perce Mounted Warrior Painted War Horse Nez Perce Indian with Beaded Leggings and Moccasins, Shirt ornamented with Wolf Skin Strips, Government Medal Indian Drawing on Buffalo Robe Habitations of Mountain Tribes, Skin-covered Lodges Indian with Beaver Cap and Fan Indian Ball Bat Wooden Lance Head Tattooed Warrior Decorated Breech Cloth Typical Sioux Warrior in Ceremonial Costume Preparatory to a “Big Talk”. Ready for the Council Standing Buffalo Facial Painting Bear Skin Cap Sioux in Full Mourning Tom-Tom and Elk Horn Scraper A Typical Indian Indian of Rank Insignia on Cap Indians Preparing for the Scalp Dance Fire Dance Snake Dancers An Arikara Indian Belt Decorated with Brass Buttons Bear Claw Necklace Painted Warrior Osage Typical Indian Encampment Typical Indian Buckskin Shirt Typical Lodge and Indians Indian Tree Grave Indian Woman weaving Basket Zuni Indian in Mourning Indian with Cap, Ornamented Shirt, Leggings and Tobacco Pouch Indian Woman Cloak decorated with Elk Teeth Gall Chief Uncpapa Sioux, and Leader of Battle of Little Big Horn Rain-in-the-Face Sitting-Bull Sioux Sitting-Bull’s Cabin, and the Place of his Death Battle of Little Big Horn Sioux Leaving Battle-Ground, Drawn by Red Horse Sioux Dead Sioux Drawn by Red Horse, Sioux Chief Warrior with Government Medal Warrior with Bear Claw Necklace Chippewa in War Costume Warm Spring Indian Woman’s Belt made of Various Colored Beads, with Thongs for Fastening Around the Body Lone Horn Prairie Wolves Coyotes Gray Wolf Overland Stage Mountain Lion Rattlesnakes at Rest Rattlesnake Preparing to Strike Prairie Dogs The Antelope Rocky Mountain Buck Bark House Sac and Fox. Remember folks, this rare antique book is nearly 120 years old. Please be sure to add me to your List of Favorite Sellers. Don’t miss out on any of my latest listings. NEETMOK BOOKS IS A REGISTERED MEMBER OF EBAYS VERO PROGRAM. When you prepare your listings you generally should use only material text, photographs, etc. And trademarks/names that you created or own yourself or licensed from the owners. Item description text; lists of contents, lists of illustrations/photos; scanned images, etc. UNAUTHORIZED USE OF ITEM DESCRIPTION TEXT INCLUDING SUMMARIES OF CONTENTS, ILLUSTRATIONS, ETC. PHOTOS OR OTHER PROPRIETARY INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED AND WILL BE REPORTED TO EBAYS VERO DEPARTMENT FOR IMMEDIATE ACTION. Track Page Views With. Auctiva’s FREE Counter. The item “1903 SAVAGE INDIANS American Indian Wars CAVALRY US Army CUSTER MASSACRE Photos” is in sale since Monday, June 21, 2021. This item is in the category “Books & Magazines\Antiquarian & Collectible”. The seller is “neetmok” and is located in South Salem, New York. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, South africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, Ukraine, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa rica, Panama, Trinidad and tobago, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Antigua and barbuda, Aruba, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Saint kitts and nevis, Saint lucia, Montserrat, Turks and caicos islands, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Brunei darussalam, Bolivia, Ecuador, Egypt, French guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Cayman islands, Liechtenstein, Sri lanka, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macao, Martinique, Maldives, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Viet nam, Uruguay.
  • Year Printed: 1903
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States
  • Topic: Indian Wars
  • Binding: Hardcover
  • Region: North America
  • Author: Humfreville
  • Subject: History
  • Original/Facsimile: Original
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Hunter & Co.
  • Place of Publication: New York
  • Special Attributes: RARE INDIAN PORTRAITS AND PHOTOS

1903 SAVAGE INDIANS American Indian Wars CAVALRY US Army CUSTER MASSACRE Photos

1872 Buffalo Land by Webb Native American INDIANS Buffalo Bill Wild Bill Hickok

1872_Buffalo_Land_by_Webb_Native_American_INDIANS_Buffalo_Bill_Wild_Bill_Hickok_01_kxad
1872 Buffalo Land by Webb Native American INDIANS Buffalo Bill Wild Bill Hickok
1872 Buffalo Land by Webb Native American INDIANS Buffalo Bill Wild Bill Hickok
1872 Buffalo Land by Webb Native American INDIANS Buffalo Bill Wild Bill Hickok
1872 Buffalo Land by Webb Native American INDIANS Buffalo Bill Wild Bill Hickok
1872 Buffalo Land by Webb Native American INDIANS Buffalo Bill Wild Bill Hickok
1872 Buffalo Land by Webb Native American INDIANS Buffalo Bill Wild Bill Hickok
1872 Buffalo Land by Webb Native American INDIANS Buffalo Bill Wild Bill Hickok
1872 Buffalo Land by Webb Native American INDIANS Buffalo Bill Wild Bill Hickok
1872 Buffalo Land by Webb Native American INDIANS Buffalo Bill Wild Bill Hickok
1872 Buffalo Land by Webb Native American INDIANS Buffalo Bill Wild Bill Hickok
1872 Buffalo Land by Webb Native American INDIANS Buffalo Bill Wild Bill Hickok
1872 Buffalo Land by Webb Native American INDIANS Buffalo Bill Wild Bill Hickok

1872 Buffalo Land by Webb Native American INDIANS Buffalo Bill Wild Bill Hickok
1872 Buffalo Land by Webb Native American INDIANS Buffalo Bill Wild Bill Hickok. Webbs famous Buffalo Land was a 19. Century historical and informational account of Native American tribes in Kansas and the Midwest states. While the Kansas Pacific Railroad was under construction, Webb published this book to help promote and benefit the project. It brought awareness to the life and careers of Buffalo Bill Cody and Wild Bill Hickok! Charmingly illustrated with over 50 engravings and photographs. Buffalo land: an authentic account of the discoveries, adventures, and mishaps of a scientific and sporting party in the wild west. With graphic descriptions of the country; the red man, savage and civilized; hunting the buffalo, antelope, elk, and wild turkey. Collation complete with all pages. Binding: Cloth; tight and secure. 9in X 6in (22.5cm x 15cm). The item “1872 Buffalo Land by Webb Native American INDIANS Buffalo Bill Wild Bill Hickok” is in sale since Monday, December 30, 2019. This item is in the category “Books & Magazines\Antiquarian & Collectible”. The seller is “schilb_antique_books” and is located in Columbia, Missouri. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Year Printed: 1872
  • Topic: American (US)
  • Binding: Cloth
  • Region: North America
  • Author: WEBB, W.E.
  • Subject: Art & Photography
  • Original/Facsimile: Original
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: E. Hannaford & Co.
  • Place of Publication: Cincinnati
  • Special Attributes: Illustrated

1872 Buffalo Land by Webb Native American INDIANS Buffalo Bill Wild Bill Hickok

1833, 1st Ed, THE BOOK OF THE INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA, DRAKE, NATIVE AMERICANS

1833_1st_Ed_THE_BOOK_OF_THE_INDIANS_OF_NORTH_AMERICA_DRAKE_NATIVE_AMERICANS_01_rxxt
1833, 1st Ed, THE BOOK OF THE INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA, DRAKE, NATIVE AMERICANS
1833, 1st Ed, THE BOOK OF THE INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA, DRAKE, NATIVE AMERICANS
1833, 1st Ed, THE BOOK OF THE INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA, DRAKE, NATIVE AMERICANS
1833, 1st Ed, THE BOOK OF THE INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA, DRAKE, NATIVE AMERICANS
1833, 1st Ed, THE BOOK OF THE INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA, DRAKE, NATIVE AMERICANS
1833, 1st Ed, THE BOOK OF THE INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA, DRAKE, NATIVE AMERICANS
1833, 1st Ed, THE BOOK OF THE INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA, DRAKE, NATIVE AMERICANS
1833, 1st Ed, THE BOOK OF THE INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA, DRAKE, NATIVE AMERICANS
1833, 1st Ed, THE BOOK OF THE INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA, DRAKE, NATIVE AMERICANS
1833, 1st Ed, THE BOOK OF THE INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA, DRAKE, NATIVE AMERICANS
1833, 1st Ed, THE BOOK OF THE INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA, DRAKE, NATIVE AMERICANS
1833, 1st Ed, THE BOOK OF THE INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA, DRAKE, NATIVE AMERICANS

1833, 1st Ed, THE BOOK OF THE INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA, DRAKE, NATIVE AMERICANS
The Book of the Indians of North America: Comprising Details in the Lives of About Five Hundred Chiefs and Others, The Most Distinguished Among Them. From Their First Being Known to Europeans to the Present Time. Exhibiting Also an Analysis of the Most Distinguished Authors who Have Written upon the Great Question of the First Peopling of America. Boston: Published by Josiah Drake. Octavo, published as five books all bound in one volume the pagination is as follows: ii, 22, 110, 124, 47, 135 pages. Bound in a period full leather binding with gilt lettering and stamped native American design to spine. Illustrated with all of the engravings called for. Some damage to spine, rubbing and wear, mostly to hinges, corners and edges. An early owner’s name, endpapers heavily foxed, scattered foxing throughout, else in good + condition. If you have any questions feel free to ask and don’t forget to check out my other listings. The item “1833, 1st Ed, THE BOOK OF THE INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA, DRAKE, NATIVE AMERICANS” is in sale since Wednesday, March 10, 2021. This item is in the category “Books & Magazines\Antiquarian & Collectible”. The seller is “dirkdensity” and is located in West Chester, Pennsylvania. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, South africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, Ukraine, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa rica, Panama, Trinidad and tobago, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Brunei darussalam, Bolivia, Ecuador, Egypt, French guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Cayman islands, Liechtenstein, Sri lanka, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macao, Martinique, Maldives, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Viet nam, Uruguay.
  • Publisher: Josiah Drake
  • Region: North America
  • Subject: History
  • Place of Publication: Boston
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States
  • Author: Samuel G. Drake
  • Topic: American (US)
  • Year Printed: 1833
  • Language: English
  • Special Attributes: 1st Edition
  • Original/Facsimile: Original
  • Binding: Leather

1833, 1st Ed, THE BOOK OF THE INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA, DRAKE, NATIVE AMERICANS

New Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare sz 10.5

New_Reebok_Court_Victory_Pump_Cowboys_INDIANS_Pack_Khaki_Navy_Red_rare_sz_10_5_01_ixu
New Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare sz 10.5
New Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare sz 10.5
New Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare sz 10.5
New Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare sz 10.5
New Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare sz 10.5
New Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare sz 10.5
New Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare sz 10.5
New Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare sz 10.5

New Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare sz 10.5
New Reebok Court Victory Pump “Cowboys and Indians Pack” Indian Khaki/Navy/Neon Orange/Red sz 10.5. Super rare especially since they used a sweet vintage oiled leather on these. Do not miss out! If you have any questions please feel free to ask as I will do my best to answer you as quickly as possible. Make sure and check out my other auctions for other great items! The item “New Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare sz 10.5″ is in sale since Sunday, March 31, 2019. This item is in the category “Clothing, Shoes & Accessories\Men\Men’s Shoes\Athletic Shoes”. The seller is “huckelberry1999″ and is located in Mount Holly, North Carolina. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Model: Reebok Court Victory Pump
  • Department: Men
  • Pattern: Native American
  • Type: Athletic
  • Upper Material: Suede
  • Color: Brown
  • Brand: Reebok
  • Product Line: Reebok The Pump
  • Theme: Cowboy
  • Width: Medium (D, M)
  • Style: Tennis Shoes
  • Shoe Height: Mid Top
  • US Shoe Size (Men’s): 10.5
  • Features: Retro
  • Euro Size: 44
  • Closure: Lace Up
  • Shoe Width: M

New Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare sz 10.5

VNDS Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare 10.5

VNDS_Reebok_Court_Victory_Pump_Cowboys_INDIANS_Pack_Khaki_Navy_Red_rare_10_5_01_yz
VNDS Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare 10.5
VNDS Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare 10.5
VNDS Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare 10.5
VNDS Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare 10.5
VNDS Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare 10.5
VNDS Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare 10.5
VNDS Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare 10.5

VNDS Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare 10.5
VNDS Reebok Court Victory Pump “Cowboys and Indians Pack” Indian Khaki/Navy/Neon Orange/Red sz 10.5. Super rare especially since they used a sweet vintage oiled leather on these. Do not miss out! If you have any questions please feel free to ask as I will do my best to answer you as quickly as possible. Make sure and check out my other auctions for other great items! The item “VNDS Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare 10.5″ is in sale since Thursday, June 4, 2020. This item is in the category “Clothing, Shoes & Accessories\Men\Men’s Shoes\Athletic Shoes”. The seller is “huckelberry1999″ and is located in Mount Holly, North Carolina. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Type: Athletic
  • Department: Men
  • Character: Blue
  • Color: Brown
  • US Shoe Size (Men’s): 10.5
  • Theme: 90s
  • Product Line: Reebok The Pump
  • Closure: Lace Up
  • Brand: Reebok
  • Model: Reebok Court Victory Pump
  • Upper Material: Suede
  • Style: Tennis Shoes
  • Features: Retro
  • Shoe Width: M
  • Shoe Height: Mid Top
  • Euro Size: 44
  • Pattern: Native American
  • Width: Medium (D, M)

VNDS Reebok Court Victory Pump Cowboys & INDIANS Pack Khaki/Navy/Red rare 10.5

Young Piegan Blackfoot Indians Native American Cabinet Card by Dusseau Butte MT

Young_Piegan_Blackfoot_Indians_Native_American_Cabinet_Card_by_Dusseau_Butte_MT_01_fh
Young Piegan Blackfoot Indians Native American Cabinet Card by Dusseau Butte MT
Young Piegan Blackfoot Indians Native American Cabinet Card by Dusseau Butte MT

Young Piegan Blackfoot Indians Native American Cabinet Card by Dusseau Butte MT
Striking image of a Piegan Blackfoot Chief and his wife. Believed to be from a Montana studio. Has a crease along the left side. First reasonable offer accepted. Please look closely at the item photos. Our photos are the best indication of condition. All of our items are listed as found! All offers considered, first reasonable offer accepted! The item “Young Piegan Blackfoot Indians Native American Cabinet Card by Dusseau Butte MT” is in sale since Saturday, November 7, 2020. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Cultures & Ethnicities\Native American\ US\1800-1934\Photographic Images”. The seller is “snootieseconds” and is located in Pratt, Kansas. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Tribal Affiliation: Blackfoot

Young Piegan Blackfoot Indians Native American Cabinet Card by Dusseau Butte MT