1892 Seneca Iroquois Native American Indian History Legends Cattaraugus New York

1892_Seneca_Iroquois_Native_American_Indian_History_Legends_Cattaraugus_New_York_01_oxtw
1892 Seneca Iroquois Native American Indian History Legends Cattaraugus New York
1892 Seneca Iroquois Native American Indian History Legends Cattaraugus New York
1892 Seneca Iroquois Native American Indian History Legends Cattaraugus New York
1892 Seneca Iroquois Native American Indian History Legends Cattaraugus New York
1892 Seneca Iroquois Native American Indian History Legends Cattaraugus New York
1892 Seneca Iroquois Native American Indian History Legends Cattaraugus New York
1892 Seneca Iroquois Native American Indian History Legends Cattaraugus New York
1892 Seneca Iroquois Native American Indian History Legends Cattaraugus New York
1892 Seneca Iroquois Native American Indian History Legends Cattaraugus New York
1892 Seneca Iroquois Native American Indian History Legends Cattaraugus New York
1892 Seneca Iroquois Native American Indian History Legends Cattaraugus New York
1892 Seneca Iroquois Native American Indian History Legends Cattaraugus New York

1892 Seneca Iroquois Native American Indian History Legends Cattaraugus New York
Note: Many of my clients are scholars and researchers seeking specific information related to their field of interest. For their convenience I include the following details directly from this book. Subject Matter Discussed/Illustrated in this Book (See Full Contents Below): Our Life Among the Iroquois Harriet Caswell First Edition Antique Illustrated Native American Indian Indians Cattaraugus Indian Reservation Seneca Indian Nation Asher Laura Wright Mission Missionary Seneca History Legends Anthropology Ethnology Iroquois Confederacy Christianity Longhouse Red Jacket Honondeuh Tuscaroras Cayugas Onondagas Oneidas Mohawks Lake Erie Hudson River. OUR LIFE AMONG THE IROQUOIS INDIANS. Published in 1892 by the Congregational Sunday School and Publishing Society, Boston and Chicago. 8″ x 6″ decorated cloth hardcover. Condition: GOOD ANTIQUE CONDITION. Exterior as shown in photo, with some surface wear, soiling, etc. Text is clean and complete. No torn, loose or missing pages. A rare antique Native American title. OUR LIFE AMONG THE IROQUOIS stands as a vital, valuable record of Seneca Indian life at the Cattaraugus Indian Reservation in southwestern New York during the mid-19th century. The Seneca Indian Nation is one of six nations comprising the Iroquois League. This book relates the experiences of missionaries Asher and Laura Wright, who lived among the Senecas at the Cattaraugus Reservation for more than 40 years. In the course of their missionary work, the Wrights translated hymns and portions of the New Testament into the Seneca language, supervised the publication of a periodical, and instituted the Thomas Asylum for Orphan and Destitute Indian Children, later known as the Thomas Indian School. At the same time, they also recorded a great deal of detailed information about Seneca history and everyday life on the reservation, preserving a vivid chronicle of Seneca existence in ways that no anthropologist or ethnologist could. It was a time of great upheavals for the Seneca as tribal allegiances shifted away from the ancient Iroquois Confederacy and more members embraced Christianity. In OUR LIFE AMONG THE IROQUOIS, the Wrights record heated religious disputes between Christian converts and Seneca traditionalists on the reservation, including a contentious tense Christmas observance held within a longhouse, a debate over the origins of the world, and Chief Logan’s fierce opposition to Christian burial rites for a relative. The Wrights also provide valuable descriptions of Seneca religious ceremonies, eyewitness accounts of community events and conversions, memorable speeches by Red Jacket and Honondeuh, and many Seneca legends, origin stories, and historical accounts. The Preface by author Harriet S. Caswell sets the stage for the story of the Wrights’ experiences among the Iroquois. A few hours’ ride from the nearest railroad station in a wagon not the easiest, over a road not the smoothest, meeting with narrow escapes as to mud holes and deep ruts, and you will find yourself upon the Cattaraugus Indian Reservation. You might as well be west of the Rocky Mountains for any indications of the pale face that you see here. Indians in the homes, on the roads, working on the farms, and building houses ; Indian children with ball clubs, snow snakes, and arrows ; Indian babies upon the backs of their mothers ; Indian corn bread boiling in the kettles under the trees; Indians here, there, and everywhere. The straight black hair and shining black eyes that mark the race everywhere meet you here. You hear the curious intonations of the strange language all about you, and yet you are only thirty miles south of Buffalo and five hundred miles from New York City. As you ride through the Reservation you note many farms of which Indian owners may well be proud and others of which they should be ashamed. You will see corn, wheat, potatoes, tomatoes, and other products of the farm in better condition than those of the neigh- boring white man; and you will see the crops of others sadly choked with weeds and perishing for want of care. I have been urged to publish these reminiscences as a tribute to the rare ability and devotion of two missionaries, and also to throw a side light upon the history and character of a fast-vanishing race. The Iroquois, long before the white man knew this country, had established his headquarters in New York State. He called it the ” Long House, ” and Lake Erie, the ” front door, ” was guarded by the Senecas. The Iroquois represented a powerful confederacy of six nations: the Senecas, Tuscaroras, Cayugas, Onondagas, Oneidas, and Mohawks. This last nation guarded the “rear door ” of the ” Long House, ” the Hudson River. The history of this curious confederacy told by an Indian as received from his ancestors will be read with peculiar interest. If this simple story of everyday life among the once formidable Iroquois open the eyes of any reader to brighter and hitherto unappreciated phases of Indian character; if it incite a throb of interest in this unfortunate race; if the record of these heroic lives, willingly given for their redemption, shall inspire one young Christian to carry to the Indian the tidings of his divine inheritance, these pages will have accomplished their purpose. To give you a better idea of the rich historical material contained in this 122-year-old book, I have provided some helpful details below, starting with a summary of the Contents. Further down the page, you can see some of the historical illustrations from the book. I hope you’ll take a few moments to have a look. CHAPTER ONE THE CHILD: Adoption The Little Runaway A Child Prayer Meeting The Sampler. CHAPTER TWO THE MAIDEN: Boarding School Essays Teaching School. Local Catechism A New Correspondent The Unseen Lover. CHAPTER THREE THE BRIDE: The Wedding Journey Old Log Mission House Reception by the Indians The Gift of Tongues Missionary Diet. CHAPTER FOUR THE YOUNG MISSIONARY: The Horse and Saddlebags Miss Bishop! He can’t mad! ” Deacon Fish Hook’s Opinion The Cholera Translating the Scriptures The Mission Church “White Man’s Bread The Light of the Mission The First Letter Experiences. CHAPTER FIVE THE FOSTER MOTHER: Catherine King Martha Hoyt Asher Wright Two-Guns Louisa Jones Henry Morrison Phinie Sheldon. CHAPTER SIX VISIT TO VERMONT: The Canal Boat Indian Children The Inverted Album. CHAPTER SEVEN WHITE CAPTIVES: Old White Chief Mary Jemison The Old Indian Burial Ground. CHAPTER EIGHT INDIAN CHARACTERS: Young-King Chief Infant Fish Hook. CHAPTER NINE THE SEVEN YEARS’ TROUBLE: The White Man’s Treaty Removal Touching Tribute A Bit of Yellow Paper The Indian Revolution. CHAPTER TEN A BOSTON GIRL AMONG THE INDIANS: “Auntie Wright” Dogs and Babies at Church Boarding with an Indian Chief Teaching School Tests of Courage Dividing the Log Pray, father! The Lace Sleeves Clean Mouths and Clear Brains An Indian Martyr Adopted into the Tribe Taken Home. CHAPTER ELEVEN THE INDIAN ORPHAN ASYLUM : “Great many goods” Narrow Escape Be very stingy of me! ” Our Johnny The Little Bird “See! ” The Stolen Baby The Revival Indian Child’s Prayer “I looked mad! Children’s Letters Blue Sky A Novel Gift. CHAPTER TWELVE BY THE WAY: The Old-fashioned Chaise Peter Twenty-Canoes The Young Infidel A Combination Picnic. CHAPTER THIRTEEN AMONG THE PAGANS: The Wonderful Box Story of Logan Mrs. George Washington John Hudson John Logan Moses Crow Grandmother Destroytown A Day Among the Pagans Mr. Porcupine Moses Cornplanter Mrs. Johnny John The Bottomless Buggy Industrial Education The Pagan Prophet Feasts and Dances. CHAPTER FOURTEEN THE MYSTERIOUS PAST : Origin of Good and Evil Before Columbus Two Hundred Years Ago Indian Funerals The Long House Wampum Belt The Calumet Who were the Kah-gwas? The Frogs Looking into the Future. CHAPTER FIFTEEN INDIAN ELOQUENCE. CHAPTER SIXTEEN “A WEDDING LIKE WHITE PEOPLE”. CHAPTER SEVENTEEN EXTRACTS FROM MRS. CHAPTER EIGHTEEN LAST MESSAGES. Remember folks, this is an 1892 First Edition. This book is 130 years old. Please be sure to add me to your List of Favorite Sellers. Don’t miss out on any of my latest listings. When you prepare your listings you generally should use only material text, photographs, etc. And trademarks/names that you created or own yourself or licensed from the owners. Item description text; lists of contents, lists of illustrations/photos; scanned images, etc. UNAUTHORIZED USE OF ITEM DESCRIPTION TEXT INCLUDING SUMMARIES OF CONTENTS, ILLUSTRATIONS, ETC. Track Page Views With. This item is in the category “Books & Magazines\Antiquarian & Collectible”. The seller is “neetmok” and is located in this country: US. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Binding: Hardcover
  • Place of Publication: Boston
  • Language: English
  • Special Attributes: 1st Edition, Illustrated
  • Author: Harriet Caswell
  • Region: North America
  • Publisher: Congregational Sunday School
  • Topic: Indians
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States
  • Subject: Americana
  • Year Printed: 1892
  • Original/Facsimile: Original

1892 Seneca Iroquois Native American Indian History Legends Cattaraugus New York